A Proboscidean Family Portrait

25 01 2010

Good tidings and well-wishes!

At the onset of last Saturday’s ‘Weekly Wonders’ post which featured Prodeinotherium, I lamented my inability to locate any reconstructions of the intriguing animal. Fortunately, however, I’ve recently stumbled upon a wonderful digitalized version of the following image which originally appeared in Jeheskel Shoshani and Pascal Tassy’s incomparable compendium “The Proboscidea: Evolution And Paleoecology Of Elephants And Their Relatives”, which features Prodeinotherium bavaricum (number 4) along with a number of its relatives. Rather than merely inject it into the aforementioned post, I’ve decided that it deserves its own article and consequently obliged.


The animals depicted in the above image are as follows:

1=Moeritherium trigodon

2=Numidotherium koholense

3=Barytherium grave

4=Prodeinotherium bavaricum

5=Palaeomastodon beadnelli

6= Mammut americanum

7= Gomphotherium angustidens

8= Platybelodon grangeri

9= Rhynchotherium tlascalae (which I’ve covered previously here)

10= Cuvieronius hyodon

11= Tetralophodon longirostris

12= Anancus arvernensis

13= Stegolophodon cautleyi

14= Stegodon ganesa (for an interesting article related to which, do go here)

15= Primelephas gomphotheroides

16= Loxodonta africana

17= Elephas maxiums

18= Mammuthus primigenius

May the fossil record continue to enchant us all!

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2 responses

26 01 2010
Doug

I hear ya. I am all too frustrated by a lack of images of all the wonderful Cenozoic beasties i read about. There’s a sketch comparing Prodeinotherium with an african elephant in the book “Evolving Eden”. Had I known you were going to do a post about Prodeinotherium, i would of scanned it in for you.

26 01 2010
tanystropheus

I’ve also seen that image (I own a copy of the book) and would’ve scanned it myself if I had access to the proper equipment. There’s also a wonderful illustration which shows the deep muscle of a Prodeinotherium neck that I wanted to use in “Mammoths, Sabertooths, and Hominids” I wanted to use…

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