Phytosaur Q & A With Dr. Hungerbuehler.

28 09 2009

Good tidings and well-wishes!

Okay, enough suspense: it’s time to bring up the curtain! My long-time readers are acutely aware of my current involvement with the Phytosauria. Recently, I’ve decided that I could use some extra incentive for completing my “Redondasaurus project” (which involves a description of a partial skull that has been sitting around the museum for over a decade without acquiring scientific attention) and have signed up on the Paleo Paper Challenge concieved by ‘The Open Source Paleontologist’ and ‘Dave Hone’s Archosaur Musings’. Essentially, the challenge is to complete any submitted project by January 2010. I’ve jumped this particular bandwagon with such paleo-practitioners as Bill Parker, ReBecca Hunt, Mike Taylor, Matt Wedel, and my good friend Brian Beatty.

A 'fighting phytosaurs' diorama on display at the Petrified Forest National Park's Museum.

A 'fighting phytosaurs' diorama on display at the Petrified Forest National Park's Museum.

I’m nearly done with cleaning the skull and have begun identifying the various bones on its dorsal (‘upper’) side, but there’s still a considerable amount of work to be done. In the meantime, it struck me that since detailed phytosaur information is rather difficult to come by on the ‘net, perhaps I should take advantage of the fact that my instructor and future co-authoris one of the world’s leading authorities on the group. So, if anyone has ever had any nagging questions about the origins, morphology, evolution, cladistics, biogeography, or anatomy of these intriguing creature, now’s the time to ask. Simply post your queries into the comments section or send me an e-mail and I’ll relay them to Dr. Hungerbuehler. The following interview will serve as a ‘special edition’ of next week’s ‘Weekly Wonder’ and will contain the grossly-belated third entry in my ‘Phytosaur Skull Update’ video series.

 

Here the good doctor stands alongside my friend and fellow student Donny Price at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque.

Here the good doctor stands alongside my friend and fellow student Donny Price at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque.

May the fossil record continue to enchant us all, and may I get off my Italian hiney to get some work done!

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One response

16 10 2009
Polprav

Hello from Russia!
Can I quote a post in your blog with the link to you?

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